April 11, 2019

Performance-infused fashion: the next frontier for fashion

techwear fashion merging together

Performance-infused fashion is heating up in a big way, mirroring societal values and evolving cultural norms. What was once a strict divide between sportswear and fashion has morphed into a need to merge form and function. While we’ve seen this evolution for quite some time, more and more brands are paying attention, which should worry both sides of the aisle. Will we see sportswear firms buying luxury conglomerates or vice-versa? Will fashion have the upper-hand, or will sportswear dominate instead?

Performance-infused fashion as a social norm

It’s no secret that social norms and associated dress codes are evolving. Even Goldman Sachs (yes, that Goldman Sachs) is changing to become more attractive to prospective employees sick of the suit and tie. We’ve become comfortable in ditching old norms in favor of performance and comfort. Sneakers at high-end restaurants have become benign, along with armies of yoga pants in sprawling metropolises. This indicates that we expect greater functionality and performance from our daily wear, especially as we do more than just commute and go to the office. Just as Apple successfully merged performance and design for computing, so too will tomorrow’s fashion greatest players through the potential avenue of performance-infused.

The nomenclature

As is the case with streetwear, there can be a bit of confusion around different categories. Athleisure, generally embodies a sense of performance but falls more on the casual and sport side. Likewise, #techwear, pushes itself to the extremes of performance thanks to the likes of Errolson Hugh’s Acronym. Nestled somewhere in between is performance-infused fashion that isn’t aiming to create a new aesthetic. It’s merely trying to incorporate some of the convenience and added value of performance in fashion. It’s best to look at the types of offerings on a spectrum. If innovative, performance-heavy fashion (like Acronym) is on the far left, then good ol’ regular workout gear can be on the far right. The more aesthetics become a consideration, the further left you go.

Street culture drives innovation

There is arguably no greater cultural force than street culture in the 21st century. It permeates music, entertainment, work, and even religion. Culture acts as a conduit for both performance and fashion as it often balances both intricately. Street culture resonates with passion and a thirst for improvement, especially amongst collectors and aficionados. For example, DJing techniques evolved from street culture as hip-hop continued to gain popularity. We continue to see these world collide at their apex, with designers like Virgil Abloh or Yoon from AMBUSH taking leading roles at some of the world’s most prestigious fashion houses. Their designs, informed by their backgrounds, are often a perfect representation of what performance-infused fashion wants to achieve: form and function. As the culturesphere continues to evolve and move society onwards, so too will innovation around this genre.

The future lies ahead

Technology has become all pervasive in our lives. From swiping left and right across our apps to getting better sleep via smart lights, humans see a constant uptick to improve wellbeing and performance. This, however, can also have nefarious effects over time. We are on an endless treadmill to improve things marginally without taking a step back and understanding tech’s larger impact on our lives. As techware continues forward, how will this endless thirst for perfection genuinely improve our lives over time? Does techware enhance us as humans, or does it drive us into a world where objects cannot simply exist for aesthetic purposes? In addition, how will Design change going forward? Perhaps this is a strong reminder that some of the best things in life simply add value by existing.

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